ArduStat – My Web Controlled Wireless Arduino Based Thermostat

Posted in Uncategorized on January 17, 2014 by Muttitude

Muttitude:

This is pretty cool

Originally posted on Rahul's Projects:

I finished my first functional Arduino project last month. It’s a typical first baby-steps ‘Hello World’ project in the Arduino world. A web-controlled thermostat.

Hardware List:

  1. Adafruit CC3000 WiFi Breakout Board
  2. Arduino Uno R3
  3. Generic Hobby Servo Motor
  4. 1 10k Resister
  5. 1 Paperclip
  6. 1 DHT11 Temperature Humidity Sensor

Since I have a functioning Honeywell T87 thermostat (And, the fact that I currently rent the house, and do not wish to make any major hardware changes), I decided to implement  a removable hardware interface with the T87, instead of going down the path of a more elegant relay-based arduino solution.

I had only 3 days available from project start to hardware implementation. First, I brainstormed all the features I would like to see in my ardustat. Then, I used the 9-box technique to classify these features in terms of ‘Difficulty’ (on the x-axis), and ‘Feature Set / Automation / Efficiency’ (on…

View original 433 more words

Posted in Uncategorized on March 13, 2013 by Muttitude

Muttitude:

The future of drive by’s….

Originally posted on Hackaday:

remote-control-car-packs-a-beretta

We’ve never really thought to ourselves “This RC car is fun, but it really needs more handguns”. And if we did, it certainly would not be a built to undertake with students. But to each his own. [Jerod Michel] is a mathematician working in China. He recently built the project seen above with a group of students. Look closely and you’ll notice that the remote control car includes a remote control Beretta strapped to the side.

He doesn’t have a blog post about the project, but you can find a couple of images and his build instructions after the break. The firearm has a motor attached to the trigger that allows it to be fired by tapping into one of the extra channels on the RC car’s PCB. But you won’t just be firing blindly. The project also includes a video transmitter which can be viewed from an LCD screen…

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HA! Excellent Chinese Post a play on words

Posted in News Articles on November 16, 2012 by Muttitude

Got this over from The Tea Leaf Nation Web Site

A recent blog post from a Peking University student on Chinese social networking site Renren.com about his girlfriend’s shopping habit went viral online. In the last four days, it has been shared over 26,000 times. At first glance, it is nothing more than a simple rant about a girlfriend’s tyranny. But reading between the lines, it quickly becomes apparent that the author is in fact talking about Chinese citizens’ relationship with their government as the Chinese Communist Party convenes its 18th National Congress, where the next generation of leaders will soon be selected. Tea Leaf Nation translates.  

Going shopping for the eighteenth time

Today is the eighteenth time I have accompanied my girlfriend to go shopping. Whenever my girlfriend goes shopping, she tends to get overly serious and way more than just fidgety about the whole thing. It always interferes with my usual pace of life. Anyway, she calls the shots at home, so can’t complain. As my girlfriend stipulates, when it approaches her shopping date, I can only make working plans for up to three days, and if I go on a business trip, I need to get her approval first. These past few days I’ve been sitting on pins and needles, praying to God that I don’t do anything wrong to ruin her good shopping mood.

The main focus of her shopping is cosmetics. She usually purchases seven or nine varieties. This time, she crossed the name of a very famous brand off her shopping list, because there have been some problems with this brand, which causes it to have lost its original reputation [referring to “Mao Zedong thought,” not mentioned in official 18th Congress propaganda]. But she’s not willing to admit [those problems] and grins at me: “Am I not getting more and more thrifty?” Fine. Whatever her reason.

Sometimes she also buys me things, though I have no say in what she buys me. She often says to me, “You see, officials always wear this brand, company bosses, too. Singers and sport stars love this brand. I even consulted the views of a few workers! All these different opinions are sufficient to represent you, aren’t’ they? I always solicit opinions in a advanced and reasonable manner.” Why can officials, bosses, singers, sport stars, and workers represent me? I don’t understand. But I guess as long as she buys things for me, I shouldn’t complain too much.

She does ask for my take on things, of course, if only occasionally. She usually takes out her iPhone, aims the camera at me, and asks me in a very journalistic or television host-like tone: “Now that I’ve bought all these things for you, are you glad? Are you happy?” Seeing my own face show up on her iPhone, hearing her iron-like interrogation, I can’t help sweating and nodding: “I lack nothing right now and life is so blissful—all because of you!”

She usually doesn’t pay attention to me when she shops. Well, you do your shopping, and I’ll tend to my own business, I think to myself. So I take out my phone to surf the net a bit. But before I can open even one page, she pops up immediately: “You can’t just get online like this when I shop! What emails are you checking? If you dare check one more, I’ll deactivate your Gmail account!” Yup, she’s such a woman: she can forget about you when she shops, but when you are too tired to give her your undivided attention, she creates problems for you from time to time, to remind you of her existence.

This time when she shops, the grandma from the neighborhood is also shopping. Look at how she shops! She is picking over the merchandise and talking over the phone at the same time: “What style do you want, hubby? Oh this is not very good. Listen, I’ll explain to you… Oh that’s not so good either. I’ll analyze it for you… Yeah okay. I’ll take your advice this time!” She seems quite fake, but the way she does it is novel. It’s interesting. But suddenly my girlfriend walks over and taps me on the shoulder: “What are you looking at? You think they are doing it right in her household? It’s such a waste of time and money, and it’s not clear they’ll do a better job of buying things than I do. Last time, she had such a long discussion with her husband it made her four-year-old child cry!”

Assistants in the shop always compete with each other to sing my girlfriend’s praises. I remind her numerous times to take heed and not to believe them, but she never listens. When people call her a “beauty” or tell her, “This fits you so well. Only people in a good shape can achieve this effect when they wear it” she’ll fly to the heavens. Her shopping process is always filled with these flatteries, from start to end. I’ve long been numb to them. She always takes great delight in listening to that.

Many guys of dubious character like to flatter her, write her love letters and do all kinds of things for her. They simply want to take advantage of her, but she can never see through it. …  and when they hear that she is going shopping for the eighteenth time with her boyfriend, put out a big pattern for “eighteen” on the sports ground, “SB” [Chinese short-hand for "18," but also a Chinese curse-word]. She is really proud of it and even shows me pictures of the pattern. Oh God, do you really [think] they love you?

Despite all these headaches she’s been giving me, she has made some progress over the years nonetheless. She still has many shortcomings, but she’s more and more open to my criticism now. I’ve known her for such a long time, from the first time we went shopping together to this eighteenth time. There have been sweet moments, but there were also moments of despair. She once tortured me [horribly] and made my life worse than death. She also took it upon herself to take care of me when I met with natural disasters.

What will our future be like? She told me many times that she wanted to be a “dear mom,” a “tender mother.” But as far as I’m concerned, only when she’s really willing to listen to me, when she has less vanity, and when she isn’t afraid of facing her own mistakes, will I marry her willingly. When will that be?

Some people might say: “What do you have in you though? You’re not afraid of her dumping you?” I really don’t worry about this question. I’ve known her for so long, and no matter how she treats me, she always vows to be my girlfriend. Why? I think it’s because without me, she loses her soul.

This is the eighteenth time I have accompanied my girlfriend to go shopping, as recorded above.

Solar Panel Leasing Concept

Posted in News Articles on November 15, 2012 by Muttitude

Found this News Report on Channel News Asia

SINGAPORE: A new concept that seeks to remove the hassle of installing bulky solar panels and drive down the costs of installation and maintenance is catching on among companies, schools and Housing and Development Board (HDB) flats.

Called “solar leasing”, any organisation can lease solar panels under a 20-year contract with the leasing company taking care of designing, financing, maintaining and operating the solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. The tenants will pay 20 per cent of upfront costs and a monthly flat rate that is not higher than the retail electricity tariff rate.

But before proponents can declare it as a possible answer to Singapore’s constant bid to diversify its energy mix – the concept has already proven to be popular in other parts of the world, including southern California, in the United States – experts had some reservations about whether the concept would take off here, even as the cost of solar panels head south.

They cited the “short-termism” that is prevalent among private property owners. The fact that most Singaporeans live in public flats also meant that the government’s buy-in will be critical. Moreover, the cost savings might not be meaningful for private properties, given the economies of scale.

Deputy CEO of the Solar Energy Research Institute of Singapore Armin Aberle pointed out: “With solar leasing, you need a roof space for the next 20 years. It’s a long term investment and, in Singapore, very few people own their own roof space and have such long-term thinking, because of the hot property market … they buy and sell very quickly.”

Dr Arberle however, pointed out that the concept may be the way to go for new HDB developments.

The first solar-leasing project was awarded in September last year: The HDB awarded a tender to Sunseap Enterprises, a solar system developer, to lease two mega-watt-peak solar PV systems for 45 HDB residential blocks in Punggol. The installations were completed last month, and the system will provide power for common area facilities such as corridor lights and lifts.

Sunseap Business Development Manager Brandon Lee said his company is planning to offer the solar leasing service to private residences “as early as next year”.

“For private residential buildings, the system size is smaller, so the unit cost will also be higher,” he said.

Sunseap’s gameplan is to use its profits from companies and other organisations to subsidise the costs for individual households, said Mr Lee.

PV World is the other company here that provides solar leasing services. Its Managing Director Loh Lean Chooi said households living in private residences may save “only about S$20 or S$30 a month” by leasing solar panels.

So far, a handful of entities have signed up for the leasing services, including Raffles Institution (RI). The school signed a lease last month for Sunseap to install 625 panels on two of the school’s blocks. The panels will generate up to 175,000 kilowatt hours of energy annually to power lighting in classrooms, lecture theatres, air conditioning units and fans. Neither Sunseap or RI would reveal the commercial terms of the lease.

According to Mr Lee, the upfront cost of a system similar to RI’s would cost S$700,000. On lease terms, organisations need to fork out only 20 per cent of that, he added.

Sakae Holdings was one of the first companies to sign a lease. It is installing some 1,400 solar panels on the roof of its headquarters in Upper Paya Lebar. Its CEO Douglas Foo said solar leasing enabled the company to invest in solar energy, despite lacking the necessary expertise.

Keppel DHCS has also leased solar panels for its district cooling system plant at Changi Business Park. The cost savings are estimated to be about 10 per cent per annum, said a the company’s spokesperson.

While Mr Lee was optimistic that more companies will come on board once the concept becomes better known, Mr Loh felt that the Government could do more to encourage companies to take up the service.

“The Government only provides subsidies to buildings if they are able to achieve the Building and Construction Authority’s Green Mark status … Also, in other places such as Europe and Australia, subsidies are provided for the 20-year lease period,” he said.

Singapore’s rapid urban renewal rate also means that building owners are afraid to commit to a 20-year lease – the minimum tenure that is needed for the solar system developers to make a profit – for the solar panels. “This is another major problem we face here,” said Mr Loh.

Raping the Land

Posted in News Articles on November 14, 2012 by Muttitude

Just been reading this article over on Asia Sentinel

Crap! people !! Start standing up against this ….

Indigenous Miners help China Loot the Philippines Image

A test via a mobile network

Posted in Uncategorized on November 12, 2012 by Muttitude

It’s 1am. End.

Posted a Photo

Posted in Photo's on November 11, 2012 by Muttitude

Image

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